Scene 2: Act III Scene 2 2 Summary & Analysis | Shakespeare | CliffsNotes - no let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp

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no let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp - Hamlet help? what does this mean? | Yahoo Answers


No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee. 55 Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice. And could of men distinguish, her election. Hath sealed thee for herself, for thou hast been—. Dec 05, 2008 · No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. Remember what he's just said: nay, do not think I flatter. Hamlet goes on to flatter Horatio, of course, in terms so fulsome that some critics have seriously suggested that Hamlet must be a woman in disguise in love with Horatio.

This is part of a difficult passage, and should be read in context. In Act III.ii, Hamlet has just given instructions to the players for “the mousetrap”, the play that is intended to reveal Claudius’ guilt in the death of Hamlet’s father. Hamlet i. That no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice And could of men distinguish, her election.

Hamlet Quotations - Who said what to whom. STUDY. PLAY. Hamlet to himself "To be or not to be - that is the question" "No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp and crook the pregnant hinges of the knee where thrift may follow fawning" Polonius to Hamlet "I did enact Julius Caesar". No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee 65 Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice And could of men distinguish, her election Hath sealed thee for herself. For thou hast been As one in suffering all that suffers nothing, 70.

Get an answer for 'I need to know who Hamlet really trusts. Who is loyal to Hamlet?' and find homework help for other Hamlet questions at eNotes No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp. That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice, And could of men distinguish, her election.

Start studying HAMLET- Act 3, Scene 2 KEY QUOTES. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. no revenue hast but thy good spirits let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp " How does Hamlet attempt to assert his dominance over Ophelia?.